General information

 

The climate in Nessebar is moderate continental with Mediterranean influence, average summer temperatures here are about 20C-26C for the water, and 28C-30C for the air. The difference between day and night temperatures does not exceed 5C. The constant sea breeze brings pleasant cool in the heat of summer. The nearness of the sea also determines the high humidity of the air.

 

June is the starting of the summer seasons, so to feel comfortable; visitors are advised to bring both swimming-suits and sweaters.


History of Nessebar

 

Originally a Thracian settlement known as Menebria founded in the 2nd millennium BC, the town became a Greek colony when settled by Dorians from Megara at the beginning of the 6th century BC, and was an important trading centre from then on and a rival of Apollonia (Sozopol). Remains from the Hellenistic period include the acropolis, a temple of Apollo, and an agora. A wall which formed part of the Greek fortifications can still be seen on the north side of the peninsula. Bronze and silver coins were minted in the city since the 5th century BC and gold coins since the 3rd century BC.

 

It was occupied in 72 AD by a Roman garrison. The town was of secondary importance during the Roman era. It started to play important role again in III-IV century. Around the year 680 the town was an Episcopal centre, and in VII-VIII century - an important, and strong and protected Byzantine naval base. In the year 812 Khan Krum conquered the town. In 864 Boris I yielded the possession of the town to Byzantine, but king Simeon captured it again. Since XI century the Slav name Messebar or Nessebar has been used together with the original name Mesambria.

 

During the Second Bulgarian Kingdom the town rulers were either Bulgarians or Byzantines. The peak of its development was during the reign of king Alexander I when the town was one of the most important centres in the Bulgarian State. The official documents issued in Mesambria gave evidence of donations given to Nessebar for the building of churches and monasteries; according to the legends - more than 40.

 

The crusaders led by Amedei VI of Savoy captured the town in 1366 and gave it to the Byzantines. The chronicles of Mesambria gave us information about the time when the town was enslaved by the Turks in 1371. The town kept its importance as an important harbour during the Turkish slavery: ships were built; corns, wood, etc. were exported. After the liberation it was turned into a small fishing town.

 

In 1956 the town was proclaimed an architectural and archeological reserve. The remnants of an antique fortified wall with a gate dating from III-IV century, the churches from V-VI century and the ones dating from the medieval period (X-XIV century), which are fine works of the medieval Bulgarian and Byzantine architecture, the 60 houses of the revival period, give the town unique appearance and atmosphere.




 
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